Mwanza - Tanzania

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SUKUMA MUSEUM CENTRE (BUJORA)

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    GET TO KNOW MORE ABOUT SUKUMA PEOPLE, CULTURE,
    Economic activities (past and present), more of this information   and comprised 52 separated independent Sukuma Kingdom or Chiefdoms.The Bujora Cultural Centre or Sukuma Museum is located at Kisesa village is the historical institutions founded for the education and support of Sukuma culture. It was established to demonstrate and preserve the Sukuma arts, the traditional culture and to discover their unique traditional and cultural heritage which is the among the richest in East Africa.

    As the Sukuma people are the largest Bantu cultural group in Tanzania, the Sukuma culture is dispersed throughout the country. The heart of Usukuma is in the Lake Zone of Mwanza, Shinyanga and   Tabora regions where the legacy of a rich art tradition is now maintained. Visiting the Bujora Cultural centre is like visiting the whole the land of the United Kingdom’s of Sukumaland! The museum displays homestead from past and present Sukuma chiefdoms, traditional dances, folktales, local Sukuma arts and variety of handcrafts tools used with previously chiefdoms.

    SUKUMA TRADITIONAL CUISINE
    As hinted earlier the Sukuma people are hardworking, hard work is supported by eating. Sukuma traditionally eat a lot of food and a large variety of food.
    Originally, Sukuma are both agriculturalists and pastoralists – Agro – Pastoralist. These activities generally go in tandem, it follows therefore that they have developed special types of food prepared in a unique palatable Sukuma cuisine. There are some of these Sukuma traditional dishes like: –

    CEREAL DISHES (BUHULU)
    This is the simplest cereal dish; it is a millet grain boiled with a bit of salt and served as it is. In the former days people went to fill the land early in the morning without having taken breakfast. Roundabout noon, this dish was brought to fields and the workers on the farm would partake this dish as breakfast and lunch. It is whole grain and very strong dish. And it would sustain the workers who will continue tilling the land thereafter until in the evening when they would go home and treat themselves to a rich palatable dinner of a variety of food.

    BUGALI:
    This is a kind of porridge, but a stiff one that, it is prepared from grain powder mainly from millet, finger millet, maize and not very often from rice. For the course grain like millet some cassava powder is mixed to make it smoother and easy to eat. Bugali is served as it is, but eaten in tandem with some other dish prepared from, all kinds of meat, fish, vegetables legumes, milk, etc.

    BUYUNGE:
    This is a kind of food prepared from the grain of finger millet (a yellow small grain) produced in the past. It is not produced much these days since it is extensively consumed by quelea birds while in the fields. The grain is husked and prepared as rice and eaten like that. It is also a strong dish and more palatable compared to Buhulu (Supra)

    MEAT DISHES:
    There are various ways of preparing meat dishes. Sukuma do not use a lot of spices, but have unique cuisine of preparing a meat dishes likes: –

    NG’HOMELE:
    A good part of meat (mostly steak), is made thin and smoke drid.When it is dry, it is kept
    open at ceiling above the three stone cooking stoves. While cooking by firewood the smoke emanating from the cooking stove goes to the dried meat above it. This does two purposes:

    PRESERVING THE MEAT FROM BACTERIA AND INSECTS.
    Smoke adds delicacy to the meat. After this process, the meat is complete as Ng’homele. In the preparation of this dish, a piece is taken as it is soft. Dry and hard, the first process is to soak up it in water and then beaten to make it. At an appropriate timing butter is added to the meat while cooking and salt. Other spices like salt and chillies may be added. The dish is then ready to be served with Bugali.

    MASHIGANGA:
    This is kind of food can be compared to the English cheese; it is prepared from milk and butter.

    MASANGU (MAKANDE):
    This is a local dish prepared from polished maize grain cooked together with a variety of legumes, e.g.: maize with mhande (njugumawe), maize (fresh) with ndulu (choroko). This is sometimes called Nkundugu.Maize with beans. In either case grounded groundnut butter may be added.

    NKALANGO (LUMU): DRIED LEAVES OF A LEGUME KNOWN AS SHII – KUNDE
    The leave is plucked and cooked, then dried in the sun until they are completely dry at which stage the leaves are no longer green (their colour in the raw), but become black. This then is kept in some container and used during the dry season when no fresh vegetables are available.

    PREPARATION:
    Nkalango is cooked in fresh milk and at an appropriate time salt and butter is added. The result is very delicious dish which is eaten with bugali. If fresh milk and butter are not available, groundnut butter can be used.